The Design blog

The Design blog


Nathalie Boutté's creation: Paper strips textured images

Posted: 23 Jun 2012 12:18 PM PDT

Asmita Prasad:

Images from Legos and dominos have become quite common these days. But designer Nathalie Boutté used the same principles of pixilation to create stunningly detailed pictures that are made entirely out of paper strips! The self-taught artist combines elements from disciplines such as painting, sculpting and photography to create art "out of" paper instead of "on" the paper itself.

Canis Major by Nathalie Boutté
Canis Major by Nathalie Boutté

Gaia by Nathalie Boutté
Gaia by Nathalie Boutté

To create these stunning images, the French artist cuts long strips of paper and then pastes them together to give the images a feather-like texture. The effect is used for all images with the texture of various papers like Nepalese Paper, Tracing Paper and Color paper and the artist uses bright shades along with grays to create the shading effect.

Memories by Nathalie Boutté
Memories by Nathalie Boutté

To fashion a more diverse color palette, the artist uses gold sheets and Indian ink. Some of Nathalie Boutté's more interesting works include pictures like the ‘Gaia’ that is created using layered maps and depicts the map of the world.

Jeune Homme à la Fleur by Nathalie Boutté
Jeune Homme à la Fleur by Nathalie Boutté

Color layer and heavy paper was used to create the image called ‘Ingénue’ and simple color paper was used to create the ‘Enfant de Papier’. The image named ‘Jeune Homme à la Fleur’ comprises of the picture of a photograph taken in 1959 by Seydou Keita in which old books were used to form an image effectively making it a picture of a picture.

Enfant de Papier by Nathalie Boutté
Enfant de Papier by Nathalie Boutté

The picture named ‘Memories’ was made using pages of a music encyclopedia and thick paper. The ‘Canis Major’ was made using Chinese ink, tracing paper and Nepalese paper.

Ingénue by Nathalie Boutté
Ingénue by Nathalie Boutté

Via: Design Boom


Sci Fi to Reality: The SeaOrbiter Ocean Explorer

Posted: 23 Jun 2012 11:47 AM PDT

Deepon Mitra:

71% of the Earth's surface is water. Marine biologists and ocean floor cartographers opine that only 20% of the world's oceans have been explored. What lies beneath the murky depths of the world's blue? What mysteries do the crashing waves hide? Wouldn't we like to know?! There could be fantastic new lifeforms which may better give us an understanding on how life evolved on earth, or, there could be monsters straight from our worst nightmares. Much needs to be explored in the seas and oceans of the world can be well illustrated with the enigma of the giant squid (for instance). We only have dead specimens to prove their existence but we have yet to find one in its natural habitat. But that may be a thing of the past with the new SeaOrbiter coming into the picture.

The SeaOrbiter
The SeaOrbiter

It seems that sci fi creations are slowly turning into reality again (Jules Verne would be proud!). The SeaOrbiter ocean explorer is a futuristic vessel which is still in its conceptual stage. Designed by Jacques Rougerie (a French architect ), he has been waiting for his dream to come true for almost 12 years now. Investors and Sponsors have seen its potential and construction of the vessel will start in October and may be completed within 2013.

The Schematics
The Schematics

The SeaOrbiter ocean explorer looks like a gargantuan white aquatic cockroach (complete with feelers!). It is the world's first free standing vertical vessel that will stand 170 feet (51 m) into the air. To better serve its purpose, half of the vessel will remain submerged underwater at all times, just like an iceberg. Considering the implications, and the vast potential of exploring and charting the world's oceans and oceanic life, the project's cost of US $52.7 million is extremely measly (taking into account the millions of dollars that are still being invested in the International Space Station). In addition, the SeaOrbiter will give marine biologists and scientists an opportunity to study marine life in their natural habitat, in real time. The vessel will accommodate 18 scientists/biologists and crew who will remain onboard the vessel. Rougerie has dubbed them the "Oceanauts", who will stay on the vessel to observe and study ocean life under its transparent hull.

Now for the specifics, the semi submersible SeaOrbiter will be divided into 2 major parts. There will be a submerged chamber that goes down 102 feet (31 m) below sea level. This will be the observation level. The part above the sea level will have an open air terrace that can be used both for observation and for sun bathing! Just like Verne's Nautilus, the submerged section of the SeaOrbiter will have panoramic windows and huge portholes (with powerful lights that will illuminate a radius of about 750m for clear visibility). A world class, mobile ocean observatory—that's what the SeaOrbiter is! The vessel will also be outfitted with the latest in sonar and oceanographic observational equipment which will continuously feed and receive data to and fro from satellites. There is also a state-of-the-art pressurized module (with multiple levels) that will allow the 'oceanauts' to delve into previously unexplored depths. The vessel will be powered by non conventional sources of energy (like, tidal, solar and wind energy) and thus will neither leave any carbon footprint nor contaminate the oceans.

The Scale Model
The Scale Model

Rougerie will be showcasing his SeaOrbiter ocean explorer project at the International Expo, 2012, in Yeosu, S. Korea with a 1:20 scale model of the vessel. An early Christmas present for marine scientists? Sure looks like one!

Via: GizMag


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